New Work

 
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Courtesy of Jenny Zhang (photo), Courtesy of Penguin Random House (inset).

How Jenny Zhang Discovered Her Literary Fairy Godmother in Lena Dunham

Reading Zhang’s stories in sequence is like looking through a prism at other people’s lives: candid, kaleidoscopic, and often illuminating. The characters in this collection come up against socioeconomic limitations; they seek to understand the contours of their parents’ and grandparents’ experiences abroad before they were born; they reckon with the power of their changing bodies. Yet their first-generation immigrant status and gender do not wholly define them. Zhang’s decision to write through an adolescent lens was born out of a desire to reclaim, as she calls it, “a time of life, especially for girls, which is either dismissed or idealized.”

 
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‘Sleeping Woman,’ Man Ray, 1929. Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art.

When We Dream About Clothes: 
Embracing the ‘Embodied Experience’ in Dreams

On a recent Saturday morning, I dream about clothes. On a single rack in a sparse space hang voluminous skirts in heavy, vintage fabrics of vermillion, baby pink, cherry red and monochrome; a jumpsuit in pastel stripes with rows of fringe; an off-the-shoulder dress of the softest silk in a rich, plum hue; and a collared shirt patterned with puzzle pieces. I run my hands over each piece, lovingly, longingly, prepared to buy and wear each one. They are completely within my grasp… Then, just as suddenly as I’d drifted off that evening, the dream ends, leaving me with little more than fragmented images of beautiful garments in a white-walled room. A question lingers, too: What – if anything – might the presence of these clothes in my dreaming mind mean? And why bother paying attention to them at all?

 
Tina Weymouth 

Tina Weymouth 

Talking Heads Bassist Tina Weymouth’s Electrifying Style

Tina Weymouth has always been more than ‘the girl in the band’. As the singular bassist in frontman David Byrne’s art-pop group Talking Heads, and later in Tom Tom Club, Weymouth’s sonic funkiness and playful performance style proved essential to solidifying each band’s distinct sound and image. One could argue that Talking Heads wouldn’t have been Talking Heads without her – or, at the very least, they wouldn’t have been half as cool. In light of Stop Making Sense director Jonathan Demme’s death a few weeks ago, AnOther reflects on Weymouth’s remarkable life in music thus far.